Landgraf’s Active Shooter Alert Bill Passes Out of Texas House

AUSTIN — Legislation by State Representative Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa) to create the Texas Active Shooter Alert System is on its way to the Texas Senate after passing out of the Texas House of Representatives by an overwhelming majority of 146-0 on Wednesday. Landgraf has described this bill as a way to save lives and prevent mass violence while protecting the constitutional rights of law-abiding Texans.

“In the aftermath of the August 31, 2019 mass shooting, I received countless calls and messages from constituents with ideas on how to save lives and prevent mass violence by establishing an active shooter alert system in Texas. That’s exactly what HB 103 sets out to do,” Landgraf said.

House Bill 103 would require the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) to develop and implement the Active Shooter Alert System. The alerts are intended to be issued quickly via SMS text and other available communications in the event of a mass active shooting situation to individuals near the location of the shooting.

Landgraf crafted HB 103, the Leilah Hernandez Act, after working with families of victims from the mass shooting. Leilah Hernandez, a 15-year-old Odessa High School student, was the youngest victim killed that tragic day in Odessa and Midland. Her mother and uncle provided committee testimony about their experience and how they believe an alert system would have saved Leilah’s life.

“Today is about remembering those we have lost and fighting to prevent other Texas families from enduring the pain that Leilah’s family has to go through,” Landgraf said after the bill was passed. “I want to honor her family’s courage and her memory, along with the memory of everyone we lost, by passing this needed legislation into law.”

The 87th Texas Legislative Session began in January and is underway through May 31st, 2021. In accordance with the Texas Constitution, the state legislature meets for a 140-day regular session every odd-numbered year to vote on legislation and pass a balanced state budget.


Landgraf’s Active Shooter Alert Bill Unanimously Passes Out of Committee

AUSTIN — Legislation by State Representative Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa) to create the Texas Active Shooter Alert System is poised to be one of the first bills considered by the Texas House of Representatives this legislative session. Representative Landgraf presented House Bill 103 during a hearing of the House Committee on Homeland Security and Public Safety on Thursday. The committee unanimously approved the bill, passing it on for consideration by the full House of Representatives.

Landgraf crafted HB 103 after working with families of victims from the August 31, 2019  mass shooting, when a mobile gunman killed 7 people and injured 25 others across Odessa and Midland. Leilah Hernandez, a 15-year-old Odessa High School student, was the youngest victim killed that tragic day. Leilah’s mother and uncle provided testimony to the committee about their experience and how they believe an alert system would have saved Leilah’s life.

“Leilah’s entire family made the 6-hour drive to Austin to testify on behalf of the bill, to tell their story and honor Leilah’s life,” Landgraf explained. “Their testimony was powerful, and motivated the committee to move the bill immediately. I am grateful for the family's strength and courage, and I am thankful to Chairman James White for moving HB 103 out of committee so quickly.”

House Bill 103 would require the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) to develop and implement the Active Shooter Alert System. DPS would activate the alert system on the request of a local law enforcement agency who determines there is an active shooter situation.

“My hope is that the Texas Active Shooter Alert System will prevent other Texas families from enduring the grief and heartbreak that Leilah’s family has to live with for the rest of their life,” Landgraf continued. “The goal of HB 103 is to save lives and assist first responders during active, mass shooting situations. This is an opportunity to keep Texans safe without infringing on anyone’s liberties.”

If passed by the Texas State House and State Senate, the Texas Active Shooter Alert System would become law on September 1, 2021.

The 87th Texas Legislative Session began in January and is underway through May 31st, 2021. In accordance with the Texas Constitution, the state legislature meets for a 140-day regular session every odd-numbered year to vote on legislation and pass a balanced state budget.

Rep. Landgraf and Mrs. Joanna Levya.

Rep. Landgraf, Leilah Hernandez's family and Father Tim Hayter.


Landgraf’s Bill Protects Basin from High-Level Radioactive Waste

AUSTIN — State Representative Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa) filed House Bill 2692 to prohibit the storage and disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Texas.

“Texas will not be a dumping ground for the rest of the country,” Landgraf said. “Passing HB 2692 will ensure that high-level radioactive waste is kept out of the oil patch and out of West Texas.”

Since 1998, federal law has required Texas to operate a facility for the disposal of low-level radioactive waste generated in the state. The low-level radioactive waste disposal facility is located in Andrews County, situated on a natural 600-foot formation of impermeable red bed clay. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is currently considering an application to allow for the storage of high-level radioactive waste at the facility.

“My constituents are on board with low-level storage, as used rubber gloves and hospital gowns provide little reason for concern. But high-level radioactive waste, like spent nuclear fuel, is a horse of an entirely different color. I filed HB 2692 for those who live and work in Andrews and the Permian Basin, and for all Texans, so that highly radioactive is not brought to or disposed of in our West Texas communities,” Landgraf concluded.

In addition to banning the storage of high-level radioactive waste at the disposal facility near Andrews, House Bill 2692 makes necessary changes to the law to ensure the facility provides an economic benefit to Andrews County and the State of Texas into the future as it continues to store low-level materials in a safe and efficient manner. The facility is the disposal site for many of the economic engines of the Texas economy, including our hospital safety net, our world-renowned oil and gas industry, and our electric generators.

The 87th Texas Legislative Session began in January and is underway through May 31st, 2021. In accordance with the Texas Constitution, the state legislature meets for a 140-day regular session every odd-numbered year to vote on legislation and pass a balanced state budget.


Landgraf Files Bill to Enhance Penalties for Rioting, Preserve First Amendment Freedoms

AUSTIN — State Representative Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa) filed House Bill 2461 to crack down on criminal rioters while protecting the constitutional rights of lawful protestors.

“Our First Amendment right to peacefully assemble must be preserved and protected,” Landgraf said. “HB 2461 will protect the ability of Texans to exercise their constitutional rights by properly punishing those who seek to take advantage of peaceful protests through violence, looting and intimidation.”

Widespread reports of individuals traveling from state to state to incite violence and looting during peaceful protests have motivated Landgraf and other state leaders, including Texas Governor Greg Abbott, to find solutions to deter such behavior and preserve the peace.

“Anyone who participates in violent riots should be held accountable for their actions. This legislation will help ensure that alleged rioters from out of state face the same standards of justice as those who call Texas home. I applaud Representative Landgraf for taking action to keep Texas a law-and-order state and I look forward to working with the Legislature to get this bill to my desk,” Governor Abbott said.

House Bill 2461 would amend Texas law to deny bail for anyone arrested for a criminal offense committed during a riot until the person makes the first official court appearance before the judge that will hear the case. House Bill 2461 also increases penalties for crimes committed during a riot, such as assault, arson or robbery.

“I’m thankful for Governor Abbott’s support of this important endeavor to preserve and protect the constitutional rights of law-abiding Texans. Those who seek to upend our constitutional republic by spreading chaos and anarchy will be met with firm resistance in the Lone Star State,” Landgraf concluded.

The 87th Texas Legislative Session began in January and is underway through May 31st, 2021. In accordance with the Texas Constitution, the state legislature meets for a 140-day regular session every odd-numbered year to vote on legislation and pass a balanced state budget.


Landgraf Fights Electricity Rate Hikes

ODESSA — State Representative Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa) submitted a letter to the Public Utility Commission of Texas (PUC) demanding it to rescind authorization for rate hikes on Texas electric bills amid recent power outages.

“You already left the taxpayers out in the cold with your lack of leadership and oversight of ERCOT,” Landgraf writes in the letter. “And yet, while they were still shivering in their homes, you decide to take more money out of their wallets -- food from their mouths -- in order to pay for mistakes made by your agency. I think not.”

The PUC held an emergency meeting earlier this week where officials introduced an order that directed the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) to correct any past prices to reflect the current shortage of energy. The order stated that “Energy prices should reflect scarcity of the supply. If customer load is being shed, scarcity is at its maximum, and the market price for the energy needed to serve that load should also be at its highest.” Lawmakers like Landgraf are concerned that this leaves Texans vulnerable to unexpected rate hikes in their energy bills.

“We cannot allow someone to exploit a market when they were the ones responsible for the dire consequences in the first place,” Landgraf’s letter continues. “On behalf of my fellow West Texans, and as a matter of principle, I demand that the Public Utility Commission of Texas rescind its authorization to ERCOT to permit rate hikes on Texas electric bills.”


Landgraf Files Texas Energy Independence Act

AUSTIN — State Representative Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa) filed House Bill 1683, dubbed the “Texas Energy Independence Act,” to stop the implementation of any overreaching new federal regulations on oil and gas production in Texas.

“This is about protecting jobs in the Permian Basin,” Landgraf said. “Like no other time in history, American energy operations are being threatened and Texas must be prepared to resist overreach in the oilpatch. I filed HB 1683 to defend our oil fields, to defend Texas jobs and businesses from the tentacles of federal bureaucracy.” 

House Bill 1683 prohibits Texas state agencies and officials from contracting with or providing assistance to any federal agency or official regarding the enforcement of a federal statute, order, rule, or regulation regulating oil and gas operations if the regulation is not already in existing state law. HB 1683 also prohibits any political subdivision in Texas from receiving any state grant funding if the political subdivision adopts any such rule or regulation of oil and gas operations. Finally, the bill provides a process for any Texan to be able to submit a report to the Texas attorney general regarding a political subdivision that enforces a federal regulation of oil and gas operations that is not in state law.

“The oil and gas industry provides billions of dollars in revenue that helps fund construction of highways and bridges all over the state, along with public education and a hundred other state services over the years,” Landgraf said. “The Texas Energy Independence Act will serve as a bulwark against overreaching federal policies that value the opinions of a vocal minority over the livelihood of hardworking Texans.”

The 87th Texas Legislative Session began in January and is underway through May 31st, 2021. In accordance with the Texas Constitution, the state legislature meets for a 140-day regular session every odd-numbered year to vote on legislation and pass a balanced state budget.


Rep. Landgraf: prioritize teachers for COVID-19 vaccine

AUSTIN — State Representative Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa) sent a letter to Governor Greg Abbott Monday advocating for Texas educators to be classified as “frontline workers” for COVID-19 vaccination purposes. This would allow many teachers who want to vaccine to be able to receive it sooner. 

“I emphatically ask you to include Texas public school employees in the priority category of ‘frontline workers,’” Landgraf writes in his letter to the governor. “These individuals are clearly on the frontlines, risking contracting COVID-19 each day in Texas schools in order to continue educating our Texas students. Employees on all levels in Texas public schools are crucial to carrying out the day-to-day operations while ensuring that a superior education is provided to our state’s schoolchildren.”

The Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) created the COVID-19 Expert Vaccine Allocation Panel (EVAP) to make recommendations on vaccine allocation decisions, including identifying groups that should be vaccinated first to provide the most protection to vulnerable populations and critical state resources. DSHS distributes the vaccine with the guidance of the EVAP. Currently, front-line healthcare workers, residents of long-term care facilities (Phase 1A), and people over 65 or with a chronic medical condition placing them at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19 (Phase 1B) are currently eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccine in Texas per the panel’s recommendations.

“My constituents in West Texas and I highly value the difficult work of our educators, who ceaselessly go above and beyond everyday of this pandemic,” Landgraf continues in his letter to the governor. “Educators have constantly supported Texas students throughout the pandemic, so it’s only fair that we must support our educators during this critical time. It is in the best interest of all Texans to ensure that our Texas public school employees are included as ‘frontline workers’ to make certain our Texas schools remain healthy.”

Landgraf and the other members of the Texas legislature convened at the Texas Capitol building for the 87th Texas Legislative Session on January 12th, 2021. Members of the Texas House and Texas Senate meet for a 140-day regular session beginning the second Tuesday in January every odd-numbered year to vote on legislation and pass a balanced state budget.


Landgraf Applauds Governor’s Action in Odessa to Protect Energy Jobs

ODESSA — State Representative Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa) joined Governor Greg Abbott in Odessa at a roundtable discussion and press conference announcing executive action on the state level to prevent the federal government from harming the oil and gas industry in Texas.

“I appreciate Governor Abbott’s leadership here,” Landgraf said. “This order demonstrates the importance of oil and gas, and specifically, the significance of the work we do in the Permian Basin. In addition to all of the jobs the industry creates, our roads, schools and nearly every other service provided by the state directly benefit from revenue generated by oil and gas production.”

Executive Order GA-33 directs every state agency to use all lawful powers and tools to challenge any federal action that threatens the continued strength, vitality, and independence of the energy industry. The order directs each agency to identify potential litigation, notice-and-comment opportunities, and any other means of preventing federal overreach within the law.

Landgraf and the other members of the Texas legislature convened at the Texas Capitol building for the 87th Texas Legislative Session on January 12th, 2021. Members of the Texas House and Texas Senate meet for a 140-day regular session beginning the second Tuesday in January every odd-numbered year to vote on legislation and pass a balanced state budget.


Landgraf Co-Authors Bill to Prohibit Abortions in Texas

AUSTIN — State Representative Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa) is throwing his full support behind House Bill 1280, a pro-life bill he co-authored to prohibit abortion procedures in Texas.

“As a father who heard his daughter’s heartbeat early during my wife’s pregnancy, I am proud to co-author this landmark bill,” Landgraf said.

“Valuing and protecting human life — before and after birth — is part of who I am. I was raised with these values, they’re central to my faith, and I will die with these values. Fundamentally, governments exist to protect the rights of the people —  including the right to life —  and that is exactly what HB 1280 sets out to do, protect the lives of unborn Texans.”

House Bill 1280 prohibits abortions in Texas unless the pregnancy poses a significant risk to the health of the mother. In such instances, HB 1280 also requires the physician performing the procedure to do everything possible to save the life of the unborn child.

“HB 1280 gives a voice to the voiceless, it offers defense for those who cannot defend themselves,” Landgraf continued. “While the Texas legislature and I cannot overturn Roe v. Wade, I can sure do my part to get Texas ready for when that historic day finally arrives. I appreciate the bill’s primary author, State Representative Giovanni Capriglione (R-Southlake) for taking the lead crafting this life-saving bill,” Landgraf concluded.

Landgraf and the other members of the Texas legislature convened at the Texas Capitol building for the 87th Texas Legislative Session on January 12th, 2021. Members of the Texas House and Texas Senate meet for a 140-day regular session beginning the second Tuesday in January every odd-numbered year to vote on legislation and pass a balanced state budget.


Landgraf Seeks to Shield Oilpatch Schools from “Robin Hood”

AUSTIN — State Representative Brooks Landgraf (R-Odessa) filed House Bill 1077 to reduce the impact of “Robin Hood” recapture payments on mineral wealthy school districts.

“The events of the last year demonstrate how necessary HB 1077 is for school districts in the oilpatch,” Landgraf said. “Many Permian Basin school districts are still sending millions of dollars back to the state in recapture payments even after the historic drop in oil demand.”

As the state's property values have risen significantly over the past decade, the state has also seen substantial growth in the number of school districts subject to recapture under Chapters 48 and 49, Texas Education Code. At the same time, oil and gas production has provided billions of dollars in tax revenue that has gone to help provide funding for education, roads, and the state's Rainy Day Fund.

“School districts in energy-producing regions of Texas bear the brunt of the Robin Hood law,” Landgraf continued. “That’s why I filed HB 1077, to give our school districts and students a chance to keep more of what we produce.”

HB 1077 seeks to provide relief to so-called mineral wealthy school districts by reducing the recapture payment amount required of these districts by an amount proportional to the percentage of the cost of the Foundation School Program funded by amounts paid to the state by school districts subject to recapture.

Landgraf and the other members of the Texas legislature convened at the Texas Capitol building for the 87th Texas Legislative Session on January 12th, 2021. Members of the Texas House and Texas Senate meet for a 140-day regular session beginning the second Tuesday in January every odd-numbered year to vote on legislation and pass a balanced state budget.